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Sending files to your graphic designer or getting your web team to upload content for you?  Here are a few simple tips about how to send that media and keep your design team happy.

Michael Holding

Send images as attachments


As a designer I am grateful when a client sends me the media resources and content I need.  I know what they want to say and I can place it correctly in context.  Clients have often sent an MS Word document or a Google Doc with the images embedded into them, thinking it’s better for everything to be in one place.  Unfortunately, this does little to help.

Embedded images can be a challenge to extract, often needing two or three additional steps and progams to get the images ready for resizing, colour correction, cropping and web optimization.

Sending your media as an email attachment is quicker and easier and will save your designer time and save you money. 

Rename your files


When sending your design team the images you want to use please remember to remame them correctly.  Referencing media is much quicker when I know that the image needed is ‘estuary-grass-1’ rather than ‘IMG_0553’. 

Send the highest quality you have


Wheter you’re sending media for print or web applications it’s best to send the highest quality files you have.  It’s always possible to make a large file smaller, but it’s challenging to make a small file large.  Image quality suffers and the effectiveness of your product in diminished.

There are many services like Google Drive, Dropbox and wetransfer.com that allow you to send much larger files and folders at once.

Logos


Your logo is important.  Your brand recognition is essential.  If you are sending your logo to a designer send a vector (.ai, .eps, .cdr), or at the very least a high quality PNG with a transparent background.  As a graphic designer it is frustrating to have to take time away from the design work to remove a background from a logo so that it will work more fluidly.

Don’t be afraid to ask for the source files


I am sometimes shocked to learn that a client does not have a copy of their logo, branded media, etc.  My personal philosophy is that the work I create belongs to my client unless there is a specific agreement otherwise.  Don’t be afraid to ask your design team for the finished resources they have created for you.  Having your own copies of those files will save a lot of time in the future, especially if you find yourself working with a new team.

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